In response to this post https://streetfightsecrets.wordpress.com/2010/07/15/pre-emptive-strikes-course-offsetting-yourself-to-set-opponent-up/#comment-74 a long term streetfightsecrets customer, Dave G asked:

A few questions for you, Mr. Grannon. Has ten years’ worth of MMA TV had any impact on how yobs initiate street combat, or is it still basically primal display, ambush or blind rush?

Second, with regard to letting a possible attacker get to within a foot of you in the interview phase, that would be highly undesirable, wouldn’t it? I suppose someone could sidle in front of you during intermission at the opera and there wouldn’t be much opportunity for a bridge, but you wouldn’t have a hope of intercepting a head butt, knee or flurry at that range. It would be pre-emption or nothing. Re the bridge: is it still a viable tool or is it becoming so well known that it actually signals violent intent?

my answer:

Mr Dave G

thanks for the reply and the questions mate

“A few questions for you, Mr. Grannon. Has ten years’ worth of MMA TV had any impact on how yobs initiate street combat, or is it still basically primal display, ambush or blind rush? ”

MMA is growing massively in popularity, especially with the demographic of folk who usually initiate antisocial, egoic violence: the 18 to 24 year old Male.

The way “yobs” initiate is still the same as you say: primal display, ambush or blind rush… but the actual application of violence has changed. Some “yobs” have gotten better at doing violence and MMA is part of that.

Whether these idiots have watched enough MMA to get up the courage to attend a gym and pursue training with some degree of discipline, or if they just get on the pads and wrestle with their mates in the garage or whether simply watching that much violence has made them smarter I couldnt say. Could be a combination of all three.

The last 2 altercations Ive been in in the last 3 weeks have involved young lads with MMA training. It’s getting huge here in New Zealand. Which is a shame for me, because kiwis tend to be taller and have led a more physical/ atheltic lives than the slobbier yobs I was used to dealing with in the UK.

Add a bit of MMA / “pretend MMA done in the living room” training into the mix and they can actually be a handful. Haymakers are straighter and more accurate, they are aimed less at the back of the head and more to the jaw/face.

Its more dangerous for people working the door for certain, everyone has to up their game, including me.

“Second, with regard to letting a possible attacker get to within a foot of you in the interview phase, that would be highly undesirable, wouldn’t it? ”

It would but its usually the way it goes unless your a doorman. Getting into any kind of conflict is undesirable and usually happens under disadvantegous circumstances: sods law or getting targetted when you are unconsciously meta communicating you are in a weaker state than usual.

So often I see people training (in combatives classes) to deal with violence that seems to replicate a verbal threat that has come across a room:

“what you fackin lookin at? you wanna fackin go?”

head peck, bounce, step in arms splayed from 5 metres away – practitioner puts up hands in classic fence and says “stay back”

Ive said it before but it bears repeating: unless you are a doorman I think this model of antisocial violence is not closely representing the reality or it is at least out of date.

Guys kicking off from across the bar like a comic book “cockney hooligan” and stepping in warning you all the way loudly and clearly that they would like a fight is just not how I see or experience violence going off.

More often you see perpetrators seeking to “passive/ aggressively” intimidate and psychologically dominate their prey, “daring” them to fight back, before gettin in range and doing some shady , cowardly attack which their friends will join in on: 1.from the back 2. after the first blow is struck and your reeling from it

Ah they joy of the pack mentality and the wannabe gangsta culture 🙂

Ive been guilty of teaching things that may now be redundant too, so much of what I have taught is focussed on one on one scenarios with a similiarly sized opponent, coming in from the front with no weapons.

I did this deliberately as I wanted people to walk before running… but now I must ask in light of my recent experiences : is this not in the current age simply redundant?

I don’t know. You gotta walk before you can run, but if runnings what you will ultimately be doing then get on with training for that.

By that I mean, one on one fights require vastly different “software” and strategies than the reality of modern antisocial violence.

“I suppose someone could sidle in front of you during intermission at the opera and there wouldn’t be much opportunity for a bridge, but you wouldn’t have a hope of intercepting a head butt, knee or flurry at that range. It would be pre-emption or nothing. Re the bridge: is it still a viable tool or is it becoming so well known that it actually signals violent intent?”

The “bridge” or “fence” is still a great tool for doormen and police, people with official “peacekeeping” roles. But for the modern citizen facing a more targetted, criminally predatorial assualt? No it possibly isnt enough, or even appropriate because as you say it could signal to the pack that is eyeing you up violent intent and / or prior training.

In this way we lose the key element of surprise. In the “six seconds of extreme violence” dvd Ive started to talk in terms of a “set up” than a “bridge” or “fence” – this is psychology applied to the modern combative scenario not martial arts with a bit of psychology stapled on.

Your intent is to “set the opponent up” for a knock out shot… should you be lucky enough to be given a chance to do so!

Now if you wanted to “set an attacker up” or effectively “lure them in” would the classic assertive “fence” be useful or would something rather sneakier be more appropriate?

The face of modern violence is changing and so must our strategies to overcome it.

Good question. Thanks.

Im keen to here your thoughts, to reply just click the button on the left to register with the blog.

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